Check out our Sing to Say blog.

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At NDi we continuously explore new ways of creating meaningful interactive content for children.

Children with autism and Expressive Language Delay struggle to communicate. Those who are more severely affected and cannot express themselves via spoken words are limited in their ability to function in the real world.

These children and their parents and caregivers are desperate for ways to communicate with each other.

In 2014 we embarked on a special project in partnership with Stacie Carroll, a gifted teacher at the Beverley School in Toronto.

Stacie’s ground-breaking work with autistic children received international recognition when she was interviewed by Leslie Stahl on 60 Minutes and Peter Mansbridge on CBC. Her innovative teaching practices - including assistive technologies - produce astounding results. In 2013 Stacie won the Prime Minister’s Award for Teaching Excellence and in 2015 won the Teacher of the Year Award from the Council for Exceptional Children.

Research

NDi Media received a grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and the Applied Research and Innovation Center at Centennial College to produce a prototype and conduct research during the development. We conducted focus groups in 6 schools in the Toronto District School Board.

NDi’s creative team and designers spent a year researching assistive technologies and the neuroscience surrounding their effectiveness particularly on the iPad.

The result is the Sing to Say prototype, an iPad application designed to facilitate communication and the acquisition of language for children with autism and Expressive Language Disorders.

NDi then received a second grant from NSERC to research a comprehensive global commercialization plan and market study. We prioritized key market opportunities and user segments and conducted interviews with leading stakeholders worldwide.

Sing to Say is hosted by the Minimops. The Minimops were created by NDi in the tradition of “aspirational” characters such as Barney and the Backyard Gang, Curious George and Dora the Explorer.