Report on the 11th Autism-Europe International Congress in Edinburgh, Scotland

The 11th Autism-Europe International Congress in Edinburgh, Scotland I returned last week from the 11th Autism-Europe International Congress in Edinburgh, Scotland. Autism Europe's congresses are held every three years and this year the event was hosted by one of the worlds oldest and most respected autism associations, the National Autistic Society - UK.  The theme of the three-day event was “Happy, Healthy and Empowered”. Professionals came from 60 countries to share the most recent developments in diagnosis, early intervention, assistive technology, education, support, employment ... Read more

We’re heading out to The National Autistic Society’s 11th Autism-Europe International Congress in Edinburgh 16-18 September 2016

We’re heading out to The National Autistic Society's 11th Autism-Europe International Congress in Edinburgh 16-18 September 2016. Autism Europe is an international congress dedicated to sharing advances in practical and scientific knowledge about autism to as broad an audience as possible, including researchers, professionals, parents and self-advocates. We are looking forward to discussing our Sing to Say™ app with this wide-ranging audience.The theme of the 2016 Congress is Happy, healthy and empowered with a focus on the most recent developments including: causes, ... Read more

47th Annual Autism Society National Conference Report – Part II: Special Appreciation for Sesame Street and Autism

47th Annual Autism Society National Conference Report - Part II Special Appreciation for Sesame Street and Autism   Sesame Street presented the latest version of their nation-wide initiative focused on young children with autism called “See Amazing in all Children”.  Our team at NDi Media found this initiative a game changer; progressive, visionary and inclusive.  See Amazing in all Children provides online resources to families, teachers and caregivers to educate them about autism, and tools to help families with everyday activities. These resources include animations, ... Read more

Beautiful minds, wasted – The Economist highlights autism

Beautiful minds, wasted – The Economist highlights autism The April 16, 2016 issue of The Economist has a cover story addressing autism entitled, “Beautiful minds, wasted, How to deal with autism”. The Economist is an important magazine, published in the UK with a print circulation of just over 1.5 million, making this an important source of information for both the community and the general public. The article dealt with a number of interesting topics including the growing prevalence of autism - particularly in ... Read more

The Rising Prevalence of Autism

The Rising Prevalence of Autism Over the years, the definitions of autism have changed dramatically and this has resulted in equally dramatic changes in its prevalence. Starting with Kanner’s narrow view of what constituted autism, the definition of autism has been progressively widened in its scope. From the mid-1960s onwards, child psychologists started using the word ‘autism’ to describe the exact opposite of what it had meant previously. In the 1950s, autism was used to refer to children who suffered from hallucinations and ... Read more

A History of Diagnosing Autism

A History of Diagnosing Autism Autistic people have always been a part of human society. Uta Frith’s analysis of the depositions of 29 witnesses in the case of Hugh Blair, son of a Scottish landowner, who in 1747 appeared in an Edinburgh court for a decision on his mental capacity argues that Blair was autistic. John Haslam published “Observations on Madness and Melancholy” in 1809 where he describes a boy with many of the classical traits of autism.     Autism comes from the Greek ... Read more

A History of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Devices – Part 1: The Pioneers

A History of AAC Devices – Part 1: The Pioneers Ancient Times The use of alternative methods of communication can be traced back to ancient times when individuals who were deaf or could not speak developed a manual language. Manual languages were also used by First Nations to communicate with members of other groups (Glennen).   Mountain Chief demonstrates the Plains Indian Sign and Gesture language. 1950s By the early 1950s, manual sign language had taken its place as a legitimate form of communication for people with ... Read more